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Hampton p.30-36: Torso Landmarks + Volume by theThirdCartel Hampton p.30-36: Torso Landmarks + Volume by theThirdCartel
Notes and studies from Hampton's figure drawing book.

Must remember that clavicles bisect the thoracic cage coronally, and do not reach all the way posteriorly. In fact, the scapulae come anteriorly to meet them.

The watercolour brush is great fun for quick shading.

Photoshop CS6, Intuos 5 with art pen.
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:icontheskaldofnvrwinter:
TheSkaldofNvrwinter Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
weirdly, I was JUST thinking about this--found this looking for height differences in females--and although these shapes are good, they don't accurately represent the main column or trunk of the body. These don't take into account the curvature of the spine and the vertebrae and how flexible the trunk is. It doesn't just bend at the waist.
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:iconthethirdcartel:
theThirdCartel Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2013
Thanks for the comment. You're correct that these are not hyper-accurate models fit for medical anatomy studies, but rather simplified (and exaggerated, to some degree) anatomical volumes and flow lines designed to convey form and gesture for drawing.

The "bend" at the waist is the natural lordotic curve of the lumbar spine which is present when the torso is in a neutral position; similarly, the T and S spines are depicted with their normal degree of kyphosis. I think Hampton's intention was to show a neutral torso in order to explain the major volumes, not to demonstrate the full spinal range of motion, hence why the figures don't involve any flexion, extension, or lateral rotation of the spine.
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:icontheskaldofnvrwinter:
TheSkaldofNvrwinter Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's a good starting place, no doubt. I found a tutorial recently that really laid the cards out on the table about the spine, the way it curves in and out. I didn't mean to be critical, though.
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:iconthethirdcartel:
theThirdCartel Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2013
You didn't come across as unduly critical at all. :) In fact, you raise some great points that I hope to have addressed to some degree, to the best of my understanding and without sounding defensive (tone is always a difficulty in written discussions.) At any rate, I can only guess at the author's intention to simplify and relegate the reader to further independent study with regard to more complex spinal motions. Is the tutorial you mentioned available online? Sounds interesting!
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:iconbodeen27:
Bodeen27 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
Excellent.. I have a few pdf's of Loomis' books!
I keep returning to them often.. ;)
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:iconthethirdcartel:
theThirdCartel Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013
Thanks. I really like Loomis's approach to perspective and used "Sucessful Drawing" to brush up on that.

Cheers for the watch, BTW. Nice gallery. :beer:
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:iconbodeen27:
Bodeen27 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Thanks... I've also been following matthew39arch on YouTube! He loves his Anatomy and his Getsure lessons are easy to follow. Thanks for the Comment. ;)
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:iconthethirdcartel:
theThirdCartel Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Cool, I'll check it out. 8-)
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:icondumbaa:
Dumbaa Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013
How would I get started on learning this?
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:iconthethirdcartel:
theThirdCartel Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013
I'm going through this book ([link]) page-by-page. The rest of my notes and studies are here: [link]

I saw your journal post and looked at your gallery. The human figure is a daunting place to start for a beginner. Line, shape, and perspective are foundational topics to master before tackling the figure. Dodson's book "Keys to Drawing" is a good introduction, even if his sketch examples are too scribbly for my tastes. Read the text and do the exercises carefully. Then do some perspective exercises (Loomis covers that in one of his books.) Only start anatomy once you've got those down pat, otherwise you'll be up for a lot of frustration, wasted time, and still have to return to the fundamentals at some point.

Hope this helps. 8-)
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